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Quarterly Journal of The American Institute for Progressive Democracy: Issue #42

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Quarterly Journal of The American Institute for Progressive Democracy

 

July 2020 - September 2020 Issue 42

By Lewis Wickes Hine

Original caption: "Sun treatment for bad wounds, Hospital #5. Wounded American soldiers taking the sun cure at American Military Hospital No. 5 at Auteuil, which is supported by the American Red Cross. In this treatment, the wound is exposed and unbandaged to the full sunshine with only the protection of a mosquito netting stretched above it to protect from insects, etc. September, 1918."

Lewis Wickes Hine / Library of Congress

From the Editor
Notes on Contributors
Poems for Today
Trump and the Billionaire Class
Enlarging the Ticket: A Democratic Strategy
Editor’s Note
A Universal Basic Income (UBI): Has Its Time Now Come?
Normalcy and The Economic Aftermath of Covid19
Implementing a Green New Deal in the Aftermath of the Coronavirus Pandemic with A Quick Look Back at FDR’s New Deal and his Economic Bill of Rights
Meeting Strangers
From the Archives: The Conservative Conception of Work
How the U.S. Can Assist Middle-Easter Cooperation

From the Editor

This issue of Progressive Democracy features first of all three major essays on economics. While the pandemic destroys lives, health and the economy, that wrecking of our economic system produces an opportunity to remake it in light of global warming and of massive inequality. While the conservatives will fight tooth-and-nail to try to return it to its previous state or even more to rid it of progressive features, we progressives will try to make it responsive to the major problems that have been held at bay by the dominance of conservativism. That is why it is important that we all prepare for the battles ahead by paying attention to what forward-thinking economists have to say. And in the essays here by Norman Clark and Andy Winnick those economic ideas are spelled out.

However, this issue also returns to something missing for a few years from this journal: political poetry. In the early days of the journal a poet and editor supplied us with poems addressed to current politics. However, since his death, we had lost that connection to poetry. A new connection has been made.

Of course, there are other interesting pieces here as well as economic writing and poetry. Do not fail to admire them also.

Notes on Contributors

Norman Clark, an economist, is Emeritus Professor at both the University of Strathclyde (Glasgow) and The Open University (England). He has held many positions both in Britain and elsewhere and has written and advised on economic development throughout the world. (Note: the title of ‘Emeritus Professor’ is not awarded in Britain as it is in the U.S. where it is given to all faculty who retire: in Britain it is awarded only to holders of chairs and then only by nomination.)

Bob Gerecke, a retired financial administrator, is a frequent contributor to Progressive Democracy making highly original suggestions about how things might be done differently in our economy and in our lives.

Ivan Light is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at UCLA. He has written about immigration issues for years, earning expert status in the field of sociology.

Cassady O’Reilly-Hahn has just graduated from Claremont Graduate University. He is Assistant Editor of Foothill Poetry Journal and is himself a poet.

Merrill Ring, after a long career as a professor of philosophy, now spends much of his retired years engaged in political work, chiefly writing about political ideas.

Andy Winnick is Emeritus Professor of Economics and Statistics, California State University Los Angeles. He has been a staff economist at the Council of Economic Advisors. He is the President of the American Institute for Progressive Democracy.

Poems for Today

By Cassady O’Reilly-Hahn

Trump and the Billionaire Class

By Ivan Light

We have 620 billionaires in this country – they have billions to spend to gain political influence and to spend on their own political campaigns for President.

Enlarging the Ticket: A Democratic Strategy

By Merrill Ring and Andy Winnick

A bold proposal to help defeat the Presidential disaster we now have: it even names names.

Editor’s Note

The United States is on the cusp of a major change (actually several major changes) in the way that our economy is structured and functions and so on our lives. Americans, in order to follow those developments, will need to become more sophisticated in their understanding of some fundamental ideas of economics.

A Universal Basic Income (UBI): Has Its Time Now Come?

By Norman Clark

This short piece has been written having just read Guy Standing’s book “Basic Income” [Pelican, 2017]; it has been driven by my belief that the time for UBI may now at last have come.

Normalcy and The Economic Aftermath of Covid19

By Norman Clark

This paper has been prompted by a newspaper article written by a well-known US journalist [Josh Marshall] who argues that it’s incorrect to suggest we shall return to the status quo ante once the pandemic is over. On the contrary a return to a life “as it was” is highly unlikely since many of the same issues will continue to prevail.

Implementing a Green New Deal in the Aftermath of the Coronavirus Pandemic with A Quick Look Back at FDR’s New Deal and his Economic Bill of Rights

By Andrew Winnick

In the 1930s, in the midst of the Great Depression, when unemployment exceeded 25% and countless millions lost their homes, Franklin D. Roosevelt undertook The New Deal to put the country back to work on a vast array of building and other projects. This effort succeeded in beginning the process of ending the Great Depression. Later, in 1944, before the end of WW II, FDR addressed the American people and presented a new Economic Bill of Rights.

Meeting Strangers

By Bob Gerecke

The recent events concerning race relations have once again reminded us
that it's easy to ignore, write off or even dislike and despise entire
groups of people if we don't know them personally as real individuals.
Some of our social divisions are racial; others are religious,
educational, occupational, or gender-based. As Rodney King said, "Can't
we all just get along?" We can if we meet and know people who are
unlike us, people with whom we don't usually mix. That's not easy to
accomplish, since we all socialize and work with those who are like us.
Even civic organizations attract specific types of members and
volunteers; others aren't comfortable there.

So here's a suggestion.

From the Archives: The Conservative Conception of Work

By Merrill Ring

Originally published in Progressive Democracy in 2011-2013; revised version here from The Ant and the Grasshopper: A Response from the Left, Merrill Ring (2017)

A central conservative objection to any Universal Basic Income program is that it is appealing because people are at bottom lazy. To be given significant sums of money without having to work for it is the dream of all layabouts. For the conservative, work is life and to not work is a crime against the human condition and deserves punishment. That conception was expressed long ago in Aesop’s fable of The Ant and The Grasshopper.

How the U.S. Can Assist Middle-Eastern Cooperation

By Bob Gerecke

After World War II, wise European statesmen adopted a resource-sharing
agreement for coal and iron ore in order to reduce the odds of more
wars.  It gradually grew into the European Union. Nations of the Middle
East need something to induce peace and cooperation among them, too. 

Submission Guidelines

Having developed far enough to expand our ‘stable’ of writers to those not on the TAIPD board or connected thereto and so to ask others to submit appropriate material for publication here, it is important to develop and explain guidelines.

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